#Three Deadly Sins of Software Development #agile #hubris

hubris

In my experience, I have encountered three deadly sins in Software Development. Project teams can overcome almost any problems if they don’t fall victim to these three deadly sins. Unfortunately we seem to have progressed through these deadly sins throughout the years as we get more and more experienced in Software Development.

Technology-Centric

Our first deadly sin was the sin of being technology-centric. The first aspect of this was the behaviour in the 1970’s where Information Technology professionals had a belief that they knew what was best for clients and would essentially decide for the clients as to the specific type of functionality delivered. I can remember early on when we still gathered requirements from the users, but we sought no validation on the design or interface. We as professionals know best in regards to how those components should be designed. Even our terminology set the stage for the principle that the business was not informed enough to make decisions on their own. They were only ‘users’ after all. Information Technology professionals would create the system and the business could simply ‘use’ the system we created. Nothing more.

The second aspect of being technology-centric came after we begrudgingly accepted that the business were more than just users and should validate the system design and interfaces. OK, we will let you control that aspect, but Information Technology Professionals will control the selection of all the technology and patterns that lie beneath the interfaces. All of those technology choices must remain with the Information Technology professionals and it would be beyond business users to provide input on technology and patterns selected. Information Technology Professionals will decide on all architecture without collaboration.

Thankfully we now understand that if a technology or architecture is truly better, that should result in more value for the client early and often.

Methodology-Centric

Shortly after being technology-centric, we flowed right into the methodology-centric phase. Alright Mr Client, you define the requirements and value that the project will deliver, but we will define exactly how we will deliver the project. This started out by defining a very specific process for the Waterfall Software Development Methodology, but has evolved throughout the years to be equally specific and constraining processes for hybrid and Agile Methodologies.

In short, any methodology that a project follows without customization for a client, project team, or project is flawed. I’ve always thought how curious it was that Agile proponents once freed of the shackles of Waterfall were so eager to put Agile shackles on every project they saw.

Topology-Centric

And the final deadly sin is one that is a bit recent to the dance, topology-centric. I use topology-centric to refer to the desire by Information Technology project teams to be embedded at a very senior, strategic level for the project. Many times the Information Technology solution can be made better if Information Technology Professionals can work together on the business problem and not just the solution. It is ironic that early on Informational Technology was trying to limit the access the business had to Information Technology components of the project and now the business is in charge to limiting the access Information technology has to the business components of the project.

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

To be clear, the deadly sin is not to that Information Technology is denied access, but rather that Information Technology demands that they should be granted access by default.

Summary

Information Technology Professionals have to remind ourselves we are a service and need to embrace the servant leadership in all aspects of project delivery.  We as Technology Professionals only encounter these deadly sins when we think we know better than the clients. If we avoid these types of Information Technology Hubris, our projects have a much better chance of success.

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